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The Still Here campaign aims to bring lung cancer out of the shadows. It raises awareness of the potential signs and symptoms, reminding us all that a cough does not just mean Covid. It also encourages and reassures those with symptoms to contact their GP – even during a lockdown.

Lung cancer is an aggressive disease and time is of the essence. With Covid set to be here for the foreseeable future, we must find a way to help everyone that needs it. We must find a way to save the lives of people with lung cancer.

Still Here Launch video

Lung cancer was not cancelled or postponed. Instead, it thrived on the anonymity covid gave. But no more! Lung cancer is still here and it’s time to shine the spotlight back on it.

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Still Here Poem

But under a shadow it can no longer stay. Already too many lives it has taken away. Lung cancer must get the attention it deserves Then there’s a chance to save and preserve.

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John coughed up blood in April. He was diagnosed with lung cancer, but six months on, he is still hasn’t had his surgery. This delay could be the difference between John surviving or John dying. This is why the Still Here campaign is so important.

Lung cancer is still here: Stephen’s story

“It all started with a cough that wouldn’t shift. He also felt really tired, which was strange as he was such an active person. His job kept him very busy. He was an excellent golfer and, surprisingly for a man of his size, he was a skilled squash player.”

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Lung cancer is still here: David’s story

“The diagnosis came as a complete shock. Dad had mentioned on a couple of occasions he had a chest infection. There had also been an episode of wheezing the year before his diagnosis, but in general, Dad was fit and healthy. Lung cancer was never even a passing thought.”

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This Lung Cancer Awareness Month, we’re raising awareness that anyone can develop lung cancer. Men and women, young and old, smokers and non-smokers. If you have lungs, you can get the disease so it is very important everyone is aware of lung cancer signs and symptoms.

It’s been an incredibly difficult year and it looks like it’s going to be an even tougher winter. But whatever happens, one thing remains certain, we will do everything we can to support those living with lung cancer and raise vital awareness of this disease. However, we can only run awareness campaigns like Still Here with your support and right now, we need both more than ever before.

Raise awareness

Help us raise awareness in your local area and online. Check out our Still Here digital awareness pack and start spreading the word – lung cancer is still here, and it won’t wait.

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Make a donation

Your donations help us push the Still Here campaign further, educating more people about the signs and symptoms, challenging more people’s misconceptions about the disease and supporting more people with the disease.

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The NHS has faced one of its biggest tests in its history with coronavirus. There have been challenges but, despite all this, the NHS is still here. So, if you have potential symptoms of lung cancer, including a persistent cough, you can and should contact your GP – even as we go back into lockdown.

Being diagnosed with lung cancer is terrifying, but more and more people are living well for longer with all stages of the disease. Earlier diagnosis and new treatments means more people can say I am still here years after their diagnosis. We must not let Covid undo all the progress we have made in treating, and curing, lung cancer.

Ruthra is still here

After suffering from repeat chest infections, Ruthra knew something wasn’t right so she asked to be referred to a respiratory physician. It was a decision that may have saved her life as Rutha was diagnosed with early stage lung cancer.

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Andy is still here

By the time Andy was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and brain mets, he could barely walk. But, after starting on treatment, his first scan showed both tumours had shrunk by about 70% and life started to return to normal.

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Cameron is still here

When Cameron was diagnosed with lung cancer, he was told it had spread to his brain, spine, kidney and liver. However, six months of treatment wiped out the cancer on his brain and took away the cancer on his spine. His kidney and liver are now clear of cancer and his main lung tumour has decreased in size.

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Jo is still here

When Jo was invited to a lung health check, she felt fit and well but that didn’t stop her being diagnosed with lung cancer. However, thanks to the Liverpool Healthy Lung Programme, Jo’s lung cancer was caught early, and she was able to have surgery to remove the tumour.

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“They couldn’t operate, so I had to have chemo. I knew I was going to go through something that wasn’t very pleasant, but I focused on the positives. The treatment might be hard going, and it might not cure me, but it will make me better. And it did; I first got told I was in remission in September 2017.”

Lizzi is still here

When Lizzi saw the word palliative on her file, her world stopped. She thought her life was over. Over a year on and a crazy trip through the Stelvio Pass in Italy, she now knows palliative care no longer means the end.

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Brian is still here

The word journey is one used quite a lot when talking about cancer. But from clubbed fingers to surgery and now having severe asthma and one lung, it’s been one heck of a journey for Brian.

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Let’s make sure there are more stories like these.
More Andy’s. More Debra’s. More Jo’s.

Raise awareness

Download our Still Here digital awareness pack and help us bring lung cancer out of the shadows. From social media banners and videos to traditional posters and leaflets, you can help us spread the word about lung cancer and maybe save someone’s life.

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Make a donation

There are many ways you can make a donation and help us push the Still Here campaign further, educate more people about the signs and symptoms, challenge more people’s misconceptions about the disease and support more people with the disease.

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