Nicola holds her #HeadHigh
After being diagnosed with lung cancer, Nicola decided to document her chemotherapy treatment so that others have a better awareness of what could be involved and what it may feel like

Lung Cancer Awareness Month 2017


Over 46,000 people are diagnosed with lung cancer every year, with nearly 36,000 dying from it. It is the UK's biggest cancer killer in both men and women. Yet despite this, it does not get the same level of coverage as other cancers. We believe this is due, in large part, to its association with smoking, the assumption that people ‘brought it on themselves’.


As the only UK charity solely dedicated to defeating lung cancer, it is our responsibility to challenge this stigma. Then, maybe it will start to get the attention and funding it so desperately needs. And that more people can say, aloud and unashamedly, that they or their loved ones has lung cancer. They should not feel ashamed to have lung cancer. They should feel they can take on lung cancer without fear of judgement or blame. They should be able to hold their #HeadHigh.

Hold your #HeadHigh

Find out more

#HeadHigh Danny

"Not every 60, 70, 80 year old is diagnosed with lung cancer. You can be young and get it as well but they don’t get the chance to get their voice out there. That's why I'm here"

Find out more
Find out more

#HeadHigh Carol

Carol has non-small cell lung cancer. After having both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, she is now on a two-year trial with the immunotherapy drug nivolumab.

Find out more
Find out more

#HeadHigh Tom

"Many people don’t survive lung cancer; a lot of people survive other forms of cancer that have funding. If more funding was given to lung cancer, more people would survive."

Find out more

You can join our #HeadHigh campaign too

Simply download our #HeadHigh boards, take a selfie and post it to social media with the hashtag #HeadHigh. Don’t forget to say who can hold their head high and why.



1 in 4 people in the UK
are less sympathetic to people with lung cancer than to those with other types of cancer

Early detection is the key to surviving lung cancer

Early detection is the key to surviving lung cancer. The sooner it is caught, the more likely you can have curative treatment so make sure you know the signs and symptoms of lung cancer.

f.alt_tag
A persistent cough
f.alt_tag
A cough that changes or gets worse
f.alt_tag
Coughing up blood / Blood in your spit
f.alt_tag
Breathlessness
f.alt_tag
Unexplained Weight Loss
f.alt_tag
Persistent chest infections
f.alt_tag
Chest and/or shoulder pain
f.alt_tag
Tiredness / fatigue
f.alt_tag
Hoarseness in your voice
f.alt_tag
Difficulty swallowing or pain when swallowing
f.alt_tag
Fever of 38C or above
f.alt_tag
Finger clubbing
f.alt_tag
Loss of appetite
f.alt_tag
Pain or discomfort under your ribs on your right side
f.alt_tag
Swelling in your face or neck
No matter your story, everyone with lung cancer can hold their #HeadHigh

Find out more

If it matters to them, it matters to me

Lung cancer nurse Karen Macrae shares her experiences of helping and supporting people with lung cancer

Find out more
Find out more

We're not afraid to talk about lung cancer

Our lung cancer nurses are on hand to talk about any questions or worries you may have. Call free on 0800 358 7200

Find out more
Find out more

I won't let lung cancer define him

Imagine losing your partner when they were just 47. Then imagine feeling unable to talk about it. This was life for Lisa after Stephen died from lung cancer.

Find out more

Be Proud and Expect Better

Share your story and help us raise awareness for lung cancer.

If you would like to share your story, please contact Rachel on rachel.avery@roycastle.org or call 0333 323 7200 ext. 9191. Or share your story on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #HeadHigh.